Connections · Fine Art · Illustration Art · Look Here

Connections: Giulio Aristide Sartorio and Milton Glaser

I posted JPEGs of Milton Glaser’s Angel Alley cover, poster, and artwork, back on 29 January 2013, and now, more than a year later, I have noticed a familiar figure in the foreground of Giulio Aristide Sartorio’s Diana of Ephesus and the Slaves (1895-1899):

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Barry Windsor-Smith · Connections · Illustration Art · Look Here

Connections: Gustave Doré and Barry Windsor-Smith

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BONUS INFO:

In The Studio (Dragon’s Dream, 1979), on pages 103 and 104, Barry Windsor-Smith provides a brief account of the genesis of Whithering:

“In the spring of 1975 I was working on a pen and ink drawing of trees, just trees. It was inspired, in part, by a wonderful painting of old Hampstead Heath by John Constable. At that time I didn’t think my audience was ready for — or let’s say interested in — a new work by me that was ‘just trees.’ Constable himself had a witticism about painting some of his pictures with ‘eye salve.’ What he meant was that he would make a picture as commercial as possible if he needed to sell it. As I wanted the fantasy market to see my tree drawing, I took a tip from Constable and applied a little ‘fantastic eye balm’: right in the middle of the picture I drew a shrouded figure of Death — a skull-headed man — and off in the distance a dark, foreboding mansion. This made the trees seemingly incidental. I called it Whithering (p. 110)… a deliberate non sequitur.” […]

“One night I got a frenzied call from an associate in London. He’d just shown a reproduction of the picture to a much respected fellow artist whom I’d never met, and whom my associate had only just met. Over the crackling transatlantic line I heard him say, ‘Hey! Guess what!… I just showed Whithering to so-and-so and guess what he said, — ‘Ahh, Constable; those trees. Barry just stuck that dead bloke in there so he could get away with drawing trees, didn’t he’?… He knew! There were a few cackles of laughter and then he hung up; that was the end of the call. I was suffering from insomnia at the time, I recall I slept that night and glowed the next day.”

Does Windsor-Smith’s reminiscence rule out the influence of Doré’s composition on Whithering? I don’t think so, but if you check out the comments section of this post, you’ll find a reader who disagrees with me.


BONUS IMAGES:

Three paintings of “Hampstead Heath” by John Constable:

Artist Self-Portraits · Connections · Fine Art · Look Here · Vincent van Gogh

Connections: Vincent van Gogh and Glenn Brown

I posted the following three images one after the other on TRANSISTORADIO earlier today, but I have since had the thought that perhaps a few folks who don’t follow my tumblr but do follow this blog will appreciate the juxtaposition, too, so here the images are, together again for the first time in a single post:

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Connections · Fine Art · Look Here · Vincent van Gogh

Connections: Theodore Rousseau and Vincent van Gogh

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I think what [the critic Gustave] Kahn says is quite true, that I haven’t paid enough attention to values, but it’ll be quite another thing they’ll say later — and no less true.

It’s not possible to do both values and colour.

Théodore Rousseau has done it better than anyone else, by mixing his colours [with bitumen] the darkness caused by time has increased, and now [some of] his paintings are hardly recognizable.

You can’t be at the pole and the equator at the same time. You have to choose. And I have high hopes of doing that, too, and it will probably be colour.

[SOURCE: Vincent van Gogh, Letter 594, addressed to Theo van Gogh, from Arles, Monday, 9 April 1888. Via vangoghletters.org.]


Connections · Fine Art · Francis Bacon · Look Here

Connections: Francis Bacon (1967) and Francis Bacon (1978)

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Keywords: Portrait of Isabel Rawsthorne Standing in a Street in Soho (1967), Landscape (1978), Francis Bacon