Admin Announcements

Well… that was interesting…

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It’s been a tense 24 hours here at RCN headquarters, but that’s what you get when you decide to change hosts at the drop of a hat. I still have a few images to upload, but other than that, I think I’ve almost got everything working again.

If you notice any problems, please reply to this post and let me know.

I know I’ve lost a few comments in the move. You’ll have to take my word that it couldn’t be helped.

My apologies to those whose comments were lost.

Excelsior?


UPDATE (26 March 2012):

Five things I’ve learned in the past week:

1. WP-SpamFree is an effective plugin to reduce WordPress spam, but it’s a resource hog; same, same, for SI CAPTCHA Anti-Spam. If you need to reduce your site’s use of system resources on a shared server, choose something else.

2. Google’s WP reCAPTCHA is an effective plugin to reduce WordPress spam, but it is NOT a resource hog because the CAPTCHA graphic is produced by a server other than the one that hosts your account; that’s desirable because the process of generating the CAPTCHA image can be resource intensive.

3. The efficiency and responsiveness of your WordPress blog can often be improved, and its resource demands diminished, via the installation of a caching plugin. WP Super Cache is a good choice, because it is simple to set up and is a proven workhorse. If you can, set WP Super Cache to “Use mod_rewrite to serve cache files.” Why? It’s all about speed, folks!

4. If you take the above steps to reduce your blog’s use of system resources, it still may not be sufficient to make your WordPress installation perform within your hosting company’s expectations on a shared server. Nobody tells you this when you sign up with a blog host, but your access to server resources is what is key when you’re running a WordPress blog, not “unlimited” file storage, or “unmetered” bandwidth, or the number of domains and subdomains you can host, or the number of SQL databases or FTP accounts or email accounts you can create, or access to your own cPanel with all the bells and whistles, etc., etc. Although such things are certainly important, when you’re running a WordPress site, access to server resources is the one ring that rules them all.

5. Fast, knowledgeable, reliable, helpful customer service and technical support are worth their weight in gold.

P.S. I hope to be able to resume regular posting in a day or two. RCN may seem to be on life support at the moment, but it’s not dead yet…

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